Kathryn Marshall

A showreel of recent works nested within, well, a “show.”

All video clips featured in the reel can be watched in their entirety on my vimeo page.
(vimeo.com/kathrynmarshall)

Happy viewing!

Music “Jumpin’ in Havana” by Chinese Man

Camerawork by Molly Mack

Directed, Performed and Produced by Kathryn Marshall

2014

(Source: vimeo.com)

                              Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Click an image to zoom. For additional work, click the BACK-ARROW at the bottom of the page.

Video stills from “Chroma Choreography.”

Video, costume design, and choreography collaboration with Noemi Bilger.

©2013

"Shark"
Cyanotype.
Large format film, B&W RC print.
8.5” x 11”

"Shark"

Cyanotype.

Large format film, B&W RC print.

8.5” x 11”

"Dilan"
Large format film. B&W RC print.
8.5” x 11”

"Dilan"

Large format film. B&W RC print.

8.5” x 11”

Large format film. B&W RC print.
8.5” x 11” 

Large format film. B&W RC print.

8.5” x 11” 

"Dilan"
Bromoil Print. Lithographic ink on Fiber paper.
8.5” x 11”

"Dilan"

Bromoil Print. Lithographic ink on Fiber paper.

8.5” x 11”

B&W Large format film. Fiber print.
8” x 11”

B&W Large format film. Fiber print.

8” x 11”

B&W Large format film. Fiber print.
8” x 11”

B&W Large format film. Fiber print.

8” x 11”

Bleached fiber prints. Phase II of the Bromoil process using the above photographs: each photograph was developed in the darkroom, dried, soaked, bleached, and then dried again. The bleaching process removes the pigment from the paper, leaving only a faint trace of the image in the areas where the silver crystals, i.e. where the emulsion hardened, rest on the surface of the print; the areas with no emulsion remain as white, raw paper, and therefore susceptible to absorbing water whereas the darker areas repel water and accept oil-based ink. 

The prints are then re-soaked, wiped down and then coated in ink with a brayer. The water-soaked paper fibers reject the ink, and upon a second washing, the image begins to reappear in the areas where the lithographic ink clung to the crystals. Eventually, after several more soakings and inkings, a more photographic image is achieved. 

The Bromoil alternative photographic process was first developed in 1907.

Bromoil photographic prints. Lithographic Ink on archival Fiber Paper.

8” x 11”